Author: wilfrid

A Royal Wedding 1445

Medieval monasteries were amongst the most impressive buildings of their times. They were spacious, sumptuously built and maintained and were certainly fitting places for the accommodation of the well-to-do. The abbey at Titchfield, although by no means the largest or richest, was nevertheless well appointed and an appropriate place for a royal wedding. The occasion…

By wilfrid 27th July 2018 0

The Beestons of Titchfield

William Beeston was a prosperous man who was living at Posbrook House towards the end of his life. He was a tenant of the earl and had the means to educate his children. His eldest son, Henry, became Master at Winchester College and New College, Oxford and his second son, William became Lieutenant Governor of…

By wilfrid 28th March 2018 0

Lord Montagu’s address

TITCHFIELD HERITAGE CHURCH INAUGURATION 1ST JULY 2017 I am delighted to be taking part in today’s inauguration of St Peter’s as a Heritage Church. A place of worship dating back over 1000 years, which contains so many significant links with the past, fully deserves to be put on the heritage map of Southern England. Whilst…

By wilfrid 1st July 2017 0

Titchfield Hundred

The manor and the hundred and the shire were Saxon administrative inventions and were adopted without change by the Normans. The French name of Manor was substituted as was County, but the Hundred  kept its Saxon name. Broadly speaking the hundred was a definable area of land between 1000 and 3000 acres which would support…

By wilfrid 29th September 2016 0

Titchfield in 1066

900 years ago this year, England’s political structure changed. The new king very quickly replaced all the minor Saxon lords known as thanes and replaced them with more powerful barons and bishops. These men were granted great tracts of land, often scattered across the country, which they could hold from the king as tenants-in-chief. In…

By wilfrid 27th September 2016 0

St Margaret’s Priory

The first thing that can be said about St Margaret’s Priory is that it was never a priory. The name was adopted in the 20th century as a fashionable name for an old building. Parts of the building date from the late 16th century or early 17th century and the dominant feature of the building,…

By wilfrid 20th September 2016 0